Thursday, March 10, 2016

My blog is now a teenager

Remember when
I used to update the blog's theme
to go with the seasons?
I've never had a teen-aged blog before. I wonder how it will behave? I have a blog post brewing that I'm strongly tempted to call "Charlotte Mason was wrong about math," just to see what kind of reaction it elicits. Can't decide whether to squelch that or roll with it. ;-)

14 comments :

  1. That's awesome!! I loved my blogging time...but I just haven't had the heart for it in the past several years. However, I've really been thinking about reviving it lately. It has been interesting watching, from the inside AND the outside, the life cycle of "the blog". For a while I thought blogs like ours (non-commercial - entirely personal) might disappear...but there are faithful bloggers like you who've kept banging away. I'm glad you have! Happy 13th Birthday, Badgermum blog!

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    1. Thanks, Kerry! It really has been an interesting journey, hasn't it? When Facebook got popular with my friends, all the informal, chatty blog posts we used to make started happening there, and then when Cindy quit almost all the really interesting conversations I was part of just kind of fell apart -- she really was the hub that held a lot together.

      As you can see I don't update it very often. I've thought of dropping the blog several times before, too, but sometimes there are things I want to write about and share that are too long for Facebook, plus I don't want them lost forever at the bottom of my FB page, so that's what's kept this blog alive after all.

      I'd love it you started blogging again! We need a rousing book club series to get us going again.

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  2. I'm impressed, Kelly. I've been book-blogging since 2009, and I thought 6 years was good... but you've really kept it going for a long time. And I love your thoughtful posts.

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    1. Well, you are FAR more consistent than I am -- I can always count on regular updates from your blog. :-)

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    2. I've been a little off the last few weeks - I used up my "cushion" of reviews and I've been in a bit of a slump. I'm hoping to climb out of it now that spring is almost here.

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  3. Girl, you are tempting me! :-) I just got Circe's Iliad study guide. . . Might be an interesting start to a book club. Or go the other directing and so something contemporary.

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    1. Swype! 'Other direction and do' is what it is supposed to say

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    2. Swype! 'Other direction and do' is what it is supposed to say

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    3. Ha ha! I figured that's what you meant.

      I'm teaching a literature and writing nano-coöp (my friend's son comes over here on Wednesday afternoons for L/W, and my son goes to her house on Friday afternoons for Science), and I'm planning books for the next couple of years. I'm thinking of doing The Sword in the Stone, which I've never read before, so doing that for a book club would be great -- it would force me to read it and think about it well ahead of time, plus it would give me insight into other people's thoughts on it.

      Seems like there was something else I've never read that's a fairly recent work, but I don't remember what it is right now.

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  4. I look forward to hearing your thoughts on Charlotte Mason and math. A lot of my own thinking about math flows from the principle that children are persons and thus deserve respect from the very beginning.

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    1. I love that about her, too, but what she says about teaching math is very much at odds with with the way she would have everything else taught. She has a very instrumentalist view, it seems to me.

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    2. Mason wrote so much material that I haven't spent the time to read -- I've only picked at her books here and there. There is definitely an emphasis on arithmetic, for which I understand she used the typical math texts of her day. But what I have seen seemed to me that she was encouraging parents and teachers to make sure the child focuses on the meaning of calculations by starting with physical models and then making mental pictures to help them reason, not just learning facts by rote.

      I do think that math was not one of Mason's primary interests. She didn't think or write as deeply about it as she did about other subjects. And because of that, it's easy for people to read their own interpretations into what she wrote and to come to different conclusions. I certainly wouldn't agree with everything I've seen presented as "Charlotte Mason math."

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  5. Wow, your blog is older than mine (mine is 11 today!!!). That is very, very cool! Most of the people I knew at the start of blogging don't really still post so it is nice to know there are other determined people out there!

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  6. Ha! I wonder how it will behave as well. :)

    Happy blogoversary. I'm glad you never quit. ♥

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